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Paula T. Kaufman

Following a long career as a University Library leader and administrator, Paula Kaufman is now the Interim Director of the Mortenson Center for International Library Programs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), where she also holds the rank of Professor. Paula was appointed UIUC University Librarian in 1999 and was invested as the Juanita J. and Robert E. Simpson Dean of Libraries and University Librarian in 2008, serving in that position until August 2013. During the 2005-2006 academic year, she served as the University’s Acting Chief Information Officer. Prior to joining Illinois, Paula served as dean of libraries at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (1988-99) and in a variety of positions at Columbia University, including Director of Academic Information Services and Acting Vice President for Information Services and University Librarian. She also worked as a librarian at Yale University and McKinsey and Company and was a co-founder and partner in Information for Business, New York City.

Paula has written and presented on topics of Return on Investment and Library Value, leadership, new service models, risk taking, and privacy, among others. Her record of service to the profession includes serving as a member of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Board of Directors, including a term as president; a founding board member of the Consortium of Academic Libraries in Illinois (CARLI; a member of the Center for Research Libraries Board of Directors, including a term as chair; and as a member of the HATHI Trust executive committee from 2008 to 2012. Currently, she serves on the boards of the Digital Preservation Network and the Champaign Public Library and on the Advisory Board of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.

Paula has been honored with the Robert Downs Intellectual Freedom Award (1989), the Illinois Library Association Illinois Academic Librarian of the Year Award (2011), the Hugh C. Atkinson Award (2010), and the ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year award (2012).

Keynote Speech:

Bold Talk, Bold Action:Meeting Changing User Needs

This keynote address will emphasize the continuing evolution of libraries from fixed physical sites to complete integration within their communities. Drawing on her academic research library leadership experience of more than 25 years, Professor Kaufman will review recent changes in users’ needs and speculate on demands that will emerge in the near future. She will use case studies of library and information services that support academic communities, including the recent emergence of research/scholars commons that reflect the recognition that faculty and graduate students require services that are distinctly different than those needed by undergraduate students. She will also discuss currently emerging research management support systems that are being developed and delivered in collaboration with other campus entities and speculate on what demands might be in the offing and how they can be met best by developing new models such as those in which librarians and other information professionals are sited within the users’ physical facilities or embedded electronically through web-based services and that require new skills and expertise.

This talk with touch on the conference themes Emerging Technologies in Libraries and Digital Literacy for Building User relationships. I would want to emphasize the continuing evolution of libraries from purely physical entities to which users had to go to entities that are becoming thoroughly integrated or infused within their organizations. I’d like to feature examples of information commons that support undergraduates in many and changing ways, research/scholars commons that first emerged with the realization that faculty and graduate students needed a different set of support services, data research and management support systems that are emerging right now and that are developed and delivered in collaboration with other campus entities (IT, colleges, etc.), and in which librarians and other information professionals either go to the user or are embedded within the users’ physical facilities and are embedded electronically through web-based services, including interactive services, and other emerging trends. If you think it’s warranted, I can devote some of my remarks to focusing on support for undergraduate teaching and learning.

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